Home General RV Living

Hello

You will find that your household needs in the RV are somewhat different than in a home with a foundation.  Thirty years ago at our first major stop in the RV, we spent hundreds of dollars at the local Kmart.  You can expect this so count on regular visits to stores like Camping World and the Wal-mart RV and houseware departments.

The inventory section gives you a list of things that you will need.  This section gives you bits and pieces of things you need to do and know.  I am fairly technical and I still need many of these things.  If you are not technical, get them all.

Warning about Drivers!

You can own your own RV or you can borrow a neighbors or you can rent an RV.  I am a fulltime owner of an RV.  There are various ways to tell that an RV driver is fulltime.  If the RV is not white/cream, it is an owner.  If it is towing a car and has a real ladder attached to the roof ladder, it is owned.  Owners are somewhat predictable and care for their equipment.  They may or may not be the best drivers but they try.

Semi-Trailer Trucks

In general these guys are your friends.  Always double-flash your brights when you feel it is safe for them to pull back in front of you.  They know how much their side draft can move you around.

On the other hand there are some truckers who just do not like RVs.  They will intentionally pull over right in front of you.  I had one Knight truck pull over so fast that if I had not hit my brakes you would not be reading this -- and the road was open in front of us.

In Mexico, I one semi pulled up next to me and hit his horn and jake-brakes at the same time.  I thought something was exploding.  He just did not like RVs.  The roads are more crowded in Mexico and on the major highways, the truckers like to think that the road is theirs -- sort of like the logging trucks in Oregon.

Rentals

Be vary wary.  I shall reword that. Be very afraid of any RV that has rental information on the front, back or sides.  You can rest assured that their primary interest is that you die.  They have no concept of how they are driving or what they are doing to other traffic on the road.  They will switch lanes without looking, straddle lanes right down the middle, back up into anything at all, and other hideous acts. One of these from CruiseAmerica.com passed my car at 80 miles an hour on US 101 the other day.  Yesterday in Yosemite one of them coming at me suddenly moved to the middle of the two lane road and came so close that I was surprised to not feel a thud and hear sheet metal tearing.  Even in the RV park these rentals are frightening people.  They jack the RV around at high speeds in and out of spaces such that I am also amazed that they are not ruining park equipment.

Trailers

Trailers with hitches pulled by cars, SUV's, and sometimes light trucks fall into this category.  These are not fulltime people and many times the drivers ignore the extra width and length of what they are towing.  These people drive their car too much to the left and ignore the fact that their trailer is crossing the yellow line.  When they pass, they almost clip off the front of your RV as they ignore the extra 30 feet past their rear window.  Most 5th wheel drivers are more aware of what they driving and are less likely to pull in front of you too soon.

Small boat trailers pulled by anything are hazardous to your health -- especially when passing.

My Opinion: an RV Driver License

I have seen drivers spend a good portion of an hour maneuvering their RV or 5th wheel into a site.  I have gotten out of my RV several times trying to save a marriage when the wife been directing her husband into a site.  Or mis-directing.  I had several sad experiences with my father trying to direct him into a site.  And there is no reason for an RV to go 80 mph on highway 101.

You must have a driver license to drive a car, SUV, or light truck.  You must have a special driver license to drive a commercial, big truck.  You must have a special license to drive a motorcycle.  For some strange reason, you do NOT need a special license to drive an RV which is as big as a big truck nor do you need a special license to haul a trailer as long as a truck.

It is time.  There are so many unqualified people driving these dinosaurs and so many near collisions and so many roof chunks taken off that someone should (I hate that word) put down a requirement that you need a special RV/towing license.

To make this concept a little more palatable maybe those who have owned a rig for five years could be grandfathered in by just providing a title and a standard license.  This would take the deluge off the DMV.  If you are still driving after 5 years, you probably are not an awful driver.

Maps and Books

A set of maps is critical.  My collection includes:

Highway Exit Numbers

Warning: Be careful of exit numbers on maps. States are beginning to standardize exit numbers to mileposts. Historically, maps just used incremented numbers.  As a result: the exit numbers on maps may have no relation to the exit number on the actual exit sign.

Computer Software

I think a laptop is essential for fulltime RV people.  If you have a laptop, then mapping software is valuable.

Microsoft Streets and Maps is a hard-to-use program but serves the purpose for trip layouts.  If you connect online, it will update highway information.  The 'hard-to-use' comment is because using the mouse causes apparent random activity on map locations.  For example, scrolling the wheel to zoom in and out causes loss of the current location while the zoom origin appears to be random.  You learn to not use the scroll wheel until you have separately mapped the area you wish to enlarge.  I re-learn this about once a week.

GPS

I have seen GPS for a couple of years but the cost has been prohibitive.  I bought the latest Microsoft Streets and Trips with a GPS sensor.  It works great -- but it does not talk.  People tell me that the talking ones are much better.  I think they are correct.  Two times on my first trip the software map in front of me had me making U-turns because I missed the highway exit ramp.  I shall learn to accommodate this or continue cussing and making U-turns.

The cost for the Microsoft product was $100 at Costco.  I saw one for $65 dollars at a different Costco using Rand McNally mapping.  If you stay in the USA and Canada, I guess either should be sufficient.  Here are my problems: 

One, I cannot afford GPS but I do need help with driving and reading a map simultaneously.  GPS appears to help with this.

Two, my last trip to Mexico.  I drove 400 km out of my way because I got lost and some kids thought it funny to give the gringo incorrect instructions.  This decided it for me: GPS before I returned to Mexico.

Now then.  Which GPS mapping products work in Mexico?  Do you think I could get a straight answer from any of the product web sites?  No.  I did not even get email responses from any of them.  The Mexican ones are all in Spanish and although I worked through some of them, the cost of the mapping software and unit was prohibitive.  Especially since they were Mexico-only.

I know that my Microsoft Streets and Trips maps Mexico but not in the same manner as it does the USA or Canada.  For these countries, the map shows all of the roads and highways with names and numbers.  For Mexico, you have to request driving instructions from one place to another to see the roads.  For me, this is acceptable and given that I have no idea what the other systems do, I can live with this.  WIth the GPS unit, I shall know quickly when I have left the specified route. 

Hint to vendors: I buy based upon responses to my email requests -- I am not brand-loyal.  You lost this one.  Maybe your web page could include information for the thousands of us who travel outside the USA and maybe you could answer emails.

Mexico is not real good about giving full detour signs.  It tells you where to turn onto the detour but you may not see any more signs indicating how to get back.  One bus I was on last year even got lost on one of the detours.  GPS would have at least let me know that I was a long way from where I wanted to go.


Courtesy and Conventions

While in a park, always wave at the other people.  Do not wave on the highway unless waved at.

With a trailer as opposed to an RV or 5th-wheel, you will not be taken seriously.

After setup, immediately walk around and meet people.  Many parks have a daily meeting so that you can get to know the management, the rules, what the facility offers, and the people staying.  All people have good travel tips and stories.

Opinion: Lights

When in the RV you like to think you are outside in the wild.  It gets dark outside in the wild.  If you need lights for entertainment or for spending the evening, there are many kinds that work well.  In general I find many people leave everything from patio lamps to scare lamps (these are the worst) to over-the-door lamps on all night.  This is one of the rudest, inconsiderate acts imaginable.  All RV parks should have an enforced dark night rule.  Maybe you need to have your porch light on in public parks.  I do not think so.  I hit this subject in other sections.  I just want you to know some of us like to see the dark.

No Rear Monitor?

You have a camera in or above the dash in an RV.  On a 5th wheel or trailer, you have extended mirrors.  The camera has an option switch to be on at all times or just when in reverse.  I keep mine set to the latter except when I really need it.  I really need it when parking or getting gas.  Since the camera is light sensitive, having it on at other times causes sudden flashes as the camera sees the sun or headlights.

More on this.  Now that I tow a car, I leave the monitor on all of the time.  If the cars disappears, I have a problem.

New monitors are in color.  Mine is black-and-white-and-gray.  New monitors are radio-controlled and do not need a cable.  This means that your 5th wheel may have one.

Park Life

Buy throw rugs (runners from Home Depot are good). You are putting the wear on a small piece of carpet that you used to put in your entire home.

A very good vacuum cleaner, with attachments, is a good investment.

I run a HEPA filter to keep the dust down. Lots of replacement filters.   When you choose a filter, verify that filters are easily available and inexpensive.  I made the mistake of buying a set of Hunter  filters from Sam's Club: filters are very expensive and very hard to find.  I think that when Sam's Club or Costco sell devices, they should also sell the supplies for those devices.  But then that is just my opinion.

Like Asians, shoes stop at the door.

Make sure everyone helps with the housework.  RVs are impossible for one person to keep clean.

Make sure you spend most of the day outside.  Have a couple collapsing lawn chairs and tables (Costco or Sam's in the spring).

Bicycles are good.

5th wheels and some RVs have large, bright, ‘scare’ lights.  Do not ever use these in parks as night lights.  In fact your door lamp should only be used as a night light in insecure neighborhoods.  Many RVers like dark.  That is why they go to secluded parks.  Lighting up the neighborhood is rude.

Storage is at a premium. Take a few multi-week excursions to figure out what you need to bring and what needs to be left behind.  Most first-timers start with too many clothes. I bought a bread-maker because I do not like tortillas.

Talk to people in the parks. Everyone has a story to tell.

Security

Maybe I am not paranoid enough.  Maybe I am too paranoid.  In any case, there are many things you can do to increase your personal and property security.

Dog

A dog is about as good as it gets.  A big dog is better.  I heard about someone with a pet panther.  Pets have their own problems and you may need licenses, health permits, etc.  See Pets.

Guns

If you have no guns now, now is not the time to start.

It goes with you or it may be stolen.  It may protect you.  It seems many people in this life-style silently carry a weapon.  You shall need to know local laws and license information.  See Guns.

There are horror stories about people having their RVs stolen at gunpoint at rest stops, parks, boondocking, wherever.  Some of these stories end up with the owners in a box when the RV is found.  This is folklore similar to the high school story about the hook found in the door handle.  The RV park salesman love to hear these stories.

If you boondock, maybe you will need your gun.  In general, I just check my cell phone for a signal when I stop.

I know you cannot take your handgun or ammunition into Mexico.  Rifle permits are hard to get.  Get caught: go to jail.  There are police checkpoints.  They may ask.  These are primarily looking for drugs but they do not turn down a found gun.

You also can take your gun to Canada: with a permit.  Permits are also hard to get.

Many east coast states have Sullivan laws.  If in doubt, buy a book indicating laws by locale.

To the local Gestapo your RV is just a big car with a self-contained sewer.

The police have the same right to search your RV that they do your car.

Ignition Locks and Alarms

These exist for RVs and after my experience, absolutely necessary.  A steering wheel lock can be easily removed by cutting a slice out of the steering wheel.  A hidden battery disconnect switch is good.  There are electronic signature ignition locks.

I do not think much of alarms that make noise.  These mostly are ignored or irritate neighbors.  When more people realize that there is a market in stolen RVs, Lo-Jack type alarms will catch on.

Fake Alarms

I have seen several RVs with a red flashing light next to the door lock.  In some cases this was just a red flashing light bought at Radio Shack.  They think that this will keep burglars away.  I do not know if they are right but it certainly will not attract burglars.

In the park

I have found life inside parks to be very secure.  I rarely lock my RV in a park unless there are too many kids with no respect for private property.

I do not have a partner so the keys I carry are the only ones.  This being the case I follow a simple procedure: when I enter the park, I do not lock the driver-side window.  I keep it unlocked as long as I am in the park.

I have tried to help a guy get back inside when he had locked himself out.  You do not want to be like this man.

Outside the park

Outside the park is a different matter.  Lock everything all of the time:

Boondocking

I should spend more time boondocking.  The boondocking people are more innovative.  The problem is finding the time.  I always seem to have an agenda.  If you spend time outside of parks, you want a small generator.  Costco has a 1.9KW Coleman for $379. Sam's price is $399. CW is $599.  Solar is available.  Buy solar at the place just north of the border at Algodones or at Costco in Canada.

Identification

Carry your passports.  They are the worldwide acceptable identification.  They also do not contain your mother's maiden name.

Keep your driver license current with a current address.

The Canadian border wants passports now.  INS says they will be required within the year.

Crossing into Mexico requires a Mexican tourist permit obtained at the border.  You will want your passport to return to the USA.  Curiously I have never been asked to identify myself when returning to the USA from Mexico. (Note: twice since I wrote this I have been asked for ID).

Driving

Driving the RV is different than driving a car – or even a truck for that matter.  Here are a few rules or considerations.

Speed

Your gas mileage goes down fast with speed as you are solid vertical wall going into the wind.  A maximum of 55 mph is a good rule.  Faster than 60 mph means that you are in the wrong lifestyle.  The idea of RVing is that you are learning to relax and enjoy the trip as well as the destination.  The big front windows let you enjoy the sights as you drive.

Control-freak states like Arizona and Wisconsin will ticket RVs for anything.  Rational states like California and Michigan will not but they will not tolerate abuse.

If you are towing anything, the maximum speed in most states is 55.

Let them pass

If you are on a two-lane road with no passing for an extended time, pull over to let the people behind you pass.  In some states when there are three vehicles behind you, this is the law -- you may ticketed for obstruction.  I will mostly pull off after a time for just one – unless he is honking or is a tailgater.

Alligators

This is what you call the tire shells that see in the road.  These will not bother most cars as their bottom sides have covers or are smooth.  These alligators can catch on your drive shaft and tear it out.  There are other things for them to catch and damage.  In any case, running over anything is not a good idea.

Windshield Rocks

Keep your distance from other vehicles, especially trucks.  Rocks that will simply fly around or glance off other vehicles will aim directly at your windshield and break it.  Make sure you have glass coverage insurance

Tires

I have a section on this but since they are so important, I reference it here.

Save a Step

Always check your step before moving.  If it is automatic, fine, if not CW always stocks new ones.  Then again, I always walk around my rig before I start looking at tires, levelers, slide alignment, antennas, debris, etc.  This means stops at truck stops, shopping, or any other short stop.  Check your lights also.  I find that the rear lights corrode and must be cleaned occasionally with steel wool.

Miscellaneous

Buy a Wal-Mart brass water pressure regulator. Then you can use a regular hose for your water.  It seems the high-priced, high-pressure hoses at Wal-Mart and CW have cheap fittings that leak under any pressure after a few uses. A long garden hose can double for car/RV washing. A short one cannot. I carry 2.

- At Home Depot buy a 5-roll package of Teflon tape for $1. Use this when connecting to faucets in parks. These have had heavy abusive use and the Teflon tape will save leak headaches.

Make sure your braking system meets the new Fed requirements. Many do not. The new ones are expensive. If your trailer brakes fail, your Ford cannot stop both of them. States are ticketing people with insufficient brakes. Wearing a seat belt is a requirement and not wearing it is a primary offense these days.

There is a convention of keeping medical and insurance information in a small zip-lock on your refrigerator inside top shelf. Good idea.

The Canadian rate of exchange is about $.67. Do not accept Canadian quarters (many in Yuma at the Fry's stores).  Did you know that the Fry family sold out to Kroger a few years back?

I never lock my rig in an RV park except when I am sleeping. Other times I always lock up tight.

Have lots of duct tape, light oil, WD-40 and aluminum foil.

Sam’s Club and Costco milk spoils before the expiration date. Costco and Sam's produce spoils sooner than grocery store (including Wal-Mart).  Always have fresh produce around.  Keeping your freezer and refrigerator full saves electricity and is good for emergencies.

Bring along space heaters. Running your furnace from propane is expensive. If you run out of propane, your freezer/refrig are good for 2 days if you keep the door closed.

When parked, keep the door open. Do not use bug spray.

Chalk around your tires in parks with high ant populations. I keep extra cans and a hose-attached bug spray for outdoors in these areas. They will climb your tires/axles and find a way in within 24 hours of your parking. I even had a mouse once.

Bungee cords are good.

Pets

Personally, having to stop for the dog on a regular basis is a constraint I do not need.

All parks expect you to pick up your dog's waste.

A cat seems to be the better choice as a travel companion.  A younger cat already trained to travel is a good choice here.  Otherwise you will need a leash, harness, and earplugs.  Find a home for the litter box, change it often, and obtain a small vacuum.

For several reasons, dry food is a good choice at this point.

Some states require a clean health statement from your vet.  Crossing country borders does need one of these.  They are only good for 30 to 60 days.  Make sure you know when you need one and have it available.

A dog seems to be the best protection against theft.  Many full-timers have dogs.  See Security.  Please, if you have a dog, keep it quiet.  Sometimes I think that dog owners are worse than indoor smokers.  Where I am right now, a neighbor has two dachshunds that he encourages to bark all day.  He sits in his oversized chair and tells them to bark at the passers-by.  He obviously has some sort of social problem.  In Benson I walked past a woman who praised her dog as it attempted to attack me at the end of its leash.  I turned a bitched at her.  Telling a dog that it is good when it attempts to terrify its neighbors is stupid.

More Conventions and Rules

While in a park, always wave at the other people. DO not wave on the highway unless waved at. With a trailer as opposed to an RV or 5th-wheel, you will not be taken seriously. It takes about 30 minutes to set up the connections and stuff. Immediately walk around and meet people. Many parks have a daily meeting so that you can get to know the people running it and the people staying. All people have good travel tips and stories.

Keep your trailer and car clean and waxed. I use the Teflon RV wax at Wal-Mart. It really does a good job and I have found nothing more slick to keep the dirt and grime off.

Buy throw rugs (runners at Home Depot are good). You are putting the wear on a small piece of carpet that you used to put in your entire home. A very good vacuum cleaner is a good investment. I run a HEPA filter to keep the dust down. Lots of replacement filters. Like Asians, shoes stop at the door.
Make sure you help Cheryl with the housework. These things are impossible to keep clean. Make sure you spend most of the day outside. Have a couple collapsing lawn chairs and tables (Costco or Sam's in the spring). Bicycles are good.

Storage is at a premium. Take a few multi-week excursions to figure out what you need to bring and what needs to be left behind. Most first-timers start with too many clothes. I bought a bread-maker because I do not like tortillas.

I should spend more time boondocking. The people are more innovative. The problem is finding the time. I always seem to have an agenda. If you spend time outside of parks, you want a small generator. Costco has a 1.9KW Coleman for $379. Sam's price is $399. CW is $599. Solar is available. Like I mentioned, buy at the place just north of the border at Algodones or at Costco in Canada.

Carry your passports. The Canadian border wants them now. INS says they will be required within the year.

Keep your tire pressure at the tire rating and check it at least weekly.

Make sure your braking system meets the new Fed requirements. Many do not. The new ones are expensive. If your trailer brakes fail, your Ford cannot stop both of them. States are ticketing people with insufficient brakes. Wearing a seat belt is a requirement and not wearing it is a primary offense these days.

There is a convention of keeping medical and insurance information in a small zip-lock on your refrigerator inside top shelf. Good idea.

Always check your step before moving. If it is automatic, fine, if not CW always stocks new ones.

Alabama does not permit overnight stays in rest areas. Most other states encourage it. Never stay overnight at a rest area near a large town.

I never lock my rig in an RV park except when I am sleeping. Other times I always lock up tight.

Have lots of duct tape, WD-40 and aluminum foil. Costco mil spoils before the expiration date. Costco and Sam's produce spoils sooner than grocery store (including Wal-Mart). Always have fresh produce around. Keeping your freezer and refrigerator full saves electricity and is good for emergencies.

Everyone thinks that RV people are rich and they are not afraid to try to get some -- some take affront that you are not willing to share the wealth. Amazing.

Bring along space heaters. Running your furnace from propane is expensive. If you run out of propane, your freezer/refrig are good for 2 days if you keep the door closed.

Drive at 55-60. Remember this is a lifestyle. If you are in a hurry, you are doing something wrong. States like AZ/WI will ticket RVs for anything. States like CA/MI will not. Talk to people in the parks. Everyone has a story to tell.

When parked, keep the door open. Do not use bug spray. Ajax around your tires in parks with high ant populations. I keep extra cans and a hose-attached bug spray for outdoors in these areas. They will climb your tires/axles and find a way in within 24 hours of your parking. I even had a mouse once. Bungee cords are good.  I bought a couple of those swimming pool noodles, cut them up and surround my hoses and cords where they enter the RV.

Electric

Velcro and Shelf Liner

People think it is funny but I Velcro everything.  The standard Velcro not the HEavy Duty.  The heavy duty adhesive is not strong enough: the hooks are stronger than the adhesive.  Stupid.  My TV controllers, my cell phone.  Anything that I do not want traveling or falling while I am driving. 

I also buy some of that rubber shelf liner for bigger items.  My laptop PC sits some of this on the dash.  My CPAP next to the bed sits on this stuff.

Canada

The Canadian rate of exchange is about $.67. Do not accept Canadian quarters:  the Yuma Fry's store will give you American quarters only if you insist.  Did you know that the Fry family sold its grocery stores in Arizona to Kroger a few years back?

Park Power Courtesy

One of the serious expenses of the RV Park is its monthly electric bill.  This is part of your annual maintenance fee if you have a park contract.  It is part of your daily rate if you are passing through.  It may be added to your bill if you are weekly or monthly or you have a membership contract permitting electric adjustments (any new contract) or any contract in some states with high electric rates.

If you pay it separately, you will be surprised at the amp-hours you use.  If you are paying for your electricity, find out what the going rate from the power company is and what you are being charged.  Some parks will double the power company rate, some will charge even.  Make sure you do not pay too much.  Read the meter.

Your RV comes with a gas water heater and usually a gas furnace to keep you warm.  Since most people go from park to park these days, they have a water heater conversion kit and a space heater.  These seriously increase the electric expense.  New RVs come with electric heating as part of the AC system.

Remember that if you use these, you are breaking the bank at the RV Park. You may be conservative in your usage but the guy next door will not be.  You are charged the average amount on your annual fee.  This is not an excuse to run up your usage.  Rather it is cause for you to see what you can do to reduce the park usage.  I try to fit in the middle.  I use space heaters.  I do not use a water heater electric stick.  I run the propane furnace for serious temperature changes.

I have learned that when connected to city power and I pay my own meter, that little electric hot water conversion rod costs me $150 per month!  You can use a lot of propane before you come close to this figure.

Notions

When flies bother you, hang a white trash bag on your screen door.  Before hang it, cut vertical strips about ¾ inch wide from bottom to almost the top.  Tape the entire width of the bag along the top of the door handle strip.  This even prevents them coming in the open door handle slot.

When ants bother you, sprinkle cleanser around your tires and levelers.  Sprinkle a few bay leaves around your floor where you first see the ants enter.  In general, you do not want to use a lot of chemicals in you motor home.

When moths bother you, buy some cedar strips or shavings at the local Home Depot and place them in your clothes closets and towel drawers.

You can go broke buying specialty cleaners.  I find a bottle of vinegar (toilet, windows), bleach (bathroom mildew), and Pine-sol (floors) cover just about everything in the household.

Living in a confined space

You are used to living in a large space with fixed scenery out each window.  I get claustrophobia in these situations unless there is a mountain in view of at least one of the windows.  In the RV you have a small space but the window scenery changes regularly.  Last week, I looked out the windows at the southern tail of the Sierra Nevada in western California.  This week I am looking out my windows at the sea of Cortez.

Last week my power was about 110v.  This week my power is 130v.

Last week, I had small dumb flies.  The flypaper took care of them nicely.  This week I have larger smarter flies.  A fly swatter takes care of these as they ignore the flypaper.

Last week I ran the space heater on at night, as I like to be comfortably warm.  This week I run the AC because the humidity is about 50% and the temperature without the AC inside is about 90.  It would be about 79 except I hate humidity.

My daughter thinks that I am cold blooded with no internal thermostat to control my body temperature.  Maybe she is right.

Think about this.  If you are paying the utilities, you may want to dress differently at different times of day.

Relationships

Living in the confined space can do terrible things to your relationship.  There are many things that will get in the way.  Be prepared to deal with them.

Dirt

Keep the dirt outside when you can.  This means having a rug and a doormat.  It means mats on the steps.  It means taking your shoes off before you enter.

Housecleaning

You are living in about ¼ the space you are used to.  If even that much.  You have the same amount of dirt.  You have to constantly clean.  No way out of this.

Wipe the sink after each use.

Keep throw rugs by the door and in front of the couch.

Chemical Usage

You can use bug spray inside.  You can spray air fresheners.  You can cook without turning on the fan.  You can do all sorts of things to contaminate your living space.  In a big house they are dangerous.  I really hate to think of the results of having embedded Raid in my home's walls.

I understand that the stuff in mothballs has been determined to be a carcinogen.  I buy little cedar blocks.

I am not paranoid: I do not wear a hood over my mouth when I pump gas.

Take care before putting poisons in your breathing space.

Hats

I always wear a hat.  Not only does this identify me, it keeps the headaches away.  Headaches?  It turns out I get headaches when my head gets sunburned.  My head gets sunburned because gray hair does not block the sun very well.  The visor also shields my eyes from the glare.  I wear a western woven hat when possible, otherwise it is the standard old man's visor/baseball cap.

Outdoors

Make sure you set up your living area outside when you stop.  This means chairs, table, lamps, whatever.  People set up a room outside by having special lights, signs, flappy things.  These flappy things serve a purpose.  They scare away flies.

If you are outside reading a book and enjoying your life, other people are likely to stop by.  If you are inside with nothing outside, they will think you are gone or are anti-social.  Living outside will improve your living conditions.

You may want a screen wall to reduce the wind or the evening sun.

You may want some sort of bug repellent or bug lamp.

Suggestions?  Questions?  Comments?  Push Home/eMail above.
Written:  2003          Updated:  June 10, 2010          Back To Top